Sink Your Teeth Into This Peanut Butter Keto Cheesecake

Ah, dessert. Though indulging your sweet tooth may seem like a thing of the past when you’re on a keto diet, it is, in fact, possible to enjoy sweet, chocolately goodness while still burning fat.

By swapping keto-crushing ingredients like regular flour and sugar for KNOW Better Double Chocolate Cookies (made with almond flour and coconut flour) and erythritol (a granulated sugar alcohol that’s sweet but calorie-free), this Peanut Butter Keto Cheesecake keeps carbs low and flavor high.

Every bite is a rich, decadent combo of chocolate glaze, creamy peanut butter filling, and chocolate cookie crust.

Peanut Butter Keto Cheesecake

*makes 16 small slices

Ingredients:

Cookie Crust:

Filling:

Chocolate Glaze:

Instructions: 

  1. Preheat your oven to 325 degrees and generously coat a nine-inch springform pan or pie dish with non-stick baking spray.
  2. Crumble the KNOW Better cookies in a small bowl and press into the bottom of the pan to form an even layer of crust. Bake for 10 to 12 minutes.
  3. In the meantime, add all of the filling ingredients except the heavy whipping cream to a large bowl. Beat with a hand mixer until combined and set aside.
  4. In a medium bowl, beat the heavy whipping cream with a hand mixer until stiff peaks form. Then, fold the whipping cream into the rest of the filling ingredients until combined.
  5. While the crust cools, make your chocolate glaze. Add the sugar-free chocolate chips and coconut oil to a small bowl, and microwave for 20 to 30 seconds. Once heated, stir until a consistent sauce forms. Then, add the sauce to a plastic bag, twisting the middle of the bag to push the sauce into one corner.
  6. Once the crush has cooled, add the filling. Then, cut off the corner of the chocolate glaze bag and drizzle the sauce across the top of the cheesecake.
  7. Refrigerate for about four to six hours to firm.

Nutrition info for one slice: 270 calories • 22 g fat • 8.25 g carbohydrates • 3 g fiber • 5.25 g net carbs • 8 g protein